News

News

Meet the Corona crew ! Episode 4 : Marlon

Meet the Corona crew !
Episode 4 : Marlon

We find ourselves in a unique situation at EV with a very stable crew: the whole team has been here for at least 3 months now! We would like to introduce you to this ‘Corona Crew’, today we get to know Marlon!

Marlon (10) is the son of Douwe and Olivia and was born at Esperanza Verde, so he lived in Peru his whole life. Growing up in the jungle, he got to know the surroundings of EV very well and he also learned a lot about the plants, fruits and animals of this region. Therefore, the volunteers are very happy if Marlon comes with them on leaf walks, since there will always be some fruits found to eat, new paths to discover or new fun facts to learn. Marlon is also always happy to lend a hand if volunteers need help catching fish, finding tortoise-leaves or if they are looking for a game-buddy on their day off.

Here comes the rest his interview:

What do you like about the jungle?

The trees and the animals.

What is your favorite animal/species?

Dogs.

What is the most annoying/difficult thing about living here?

There are no friends nearby. I can’t just go to the neighborhood kids and play.

What is your favorite thing to do in your free time?

Watch movies, play games on Nintendo/phone. But if someone wants to fish, I like to do that.

What do you do first when you go to the Netherlands?

If there is snow, I would play with it. I also like swimming or playing pinball at my grandparents house.

Do you like it not going to school for a year because of Corona?

No, at school there are friends and I have a break.

What would you do with 5000 soles?

I would buy an indestructible drone with a camera.

What is the best present you ever got for your birthday?

A triple drone (boat, car and drone in one).

What is your favorite meal?

Pasta white sauce a la Manish (a luxurious hotel in Pucallpa).

Interviews

Meet the Corona crew ! Episode 3 : Kayla

Meet the Corona crew !
Episode 3 : Kayla

We find ourselves in a unique situation at EV with a very stable crew: the whole team has been here for at least 3 months now! We would like to introduce you to this ‘Corona Crew’, today in the spotlight: Kayla!

Kayla (15) is the daughter of Douwe and Olivia. She was born in Ecuador and moved with her parents to Peru when she was 5 years old. Last year Kayla lived in Pucallpa to go to school there, but due to Corona this year she moved back to EV. This is unlucky for her but the volunteers are very pleased with this situation: Kayla is an excellent cook and she provides us with the best lunch meals every weekday now!

Here comes the rest her interview:

What do you like about the jungle?

I suppose it is the simplicity but at the same time the complicated way of life itself in the jungle. The way everything inside the jungle has a role to play. Yet it’s still as simple as instinct (I hope you understand what I mean).

What is your favorite animal/species?

Capuchins because they are incredibly smart and just a tad evil, plus they have very complicated characters and never forget someone that treats them well. But also squirrel monkeys because they are amazing, small, beautiful and very loyal, fierce and brave.

What did you learn by growing up in the jungle?

Lots of things: empathy, love for anything and everything. You learn to be strong in many aspects. But I guess one of the most important ones is learning to appreciate the simple things and make do with what you got (although that is more something you learn by living in the village).

Can you give an example of a Dutch personality trait you developed because you were raised by Dutch parents?

Not really, it is so mixed that I couldn’t tell where I got certain traits from. I may have developed an open mind.

What do you like about living in Peru compared to the Netherlands?

Everything! I love the heat, the warm culture, and the traditions that are full of love, the kindness of the people, the simple way of life, the way we just take everything as it comes in Peru and worry about it when we get there. I don’t like the cold culture in the Netherlands that much. The fact that people care more about just going through the days and don’t stop at the simple things anymore. I also don’t like the way that everyone just cares about themselves in the trains or in the streets.

What would make EV nicer in your opinion?

Hard question… I think, a better separation between the enclosures and the buildings, better quality and setup inside the volunteer house (in an architectural kind of way) and maybe some more contact with the local culture (up until a certain point).

What is your favorite thing to do in your free time?

Definitely read and cook. If a book is really good, you’ll see me walking around with it for a while.

What do you do first when you go to the Netherlands?

Eat sausages, pickles and whipped cream. I know what you are thinking, and no, I do not eat them together. Oh, and I immediately miss the heat of Peru and properly cooked rice.

Do you see yourself living in Peru in the coming years?

No.

What would you do with 5000 soles?

I would find a way to finance studies for my friends (don’t ask me how because I have absolutely no idea how to do that with only 5000 soles).

If you would have your own restaurant, what would definitely be on the menu?

Anticuchos (chicken or meat on sticks, chicken stomach, feet, liver, or heart), ceviche, arroz a la cubana, aji de gallina and cachangas.

Interviews

Meet the Corona crew ! Episode 2 : Olivia

Meet the Corona crew !
Episode 2 : Olivia

We find ourselves in a unique situation at EV with a very stable crew: the whole team has been here for at least 3 months now! We would like to introduce you to this ‘Corona Crew’, next up: Olivia!

Olivia founded Esperanza Verde 10 years ago with Douwe, and is still the passionate director of this place. Everybody who has ever been there will know that Olivia is an all-rounder and has a lot of different jobs to do at EV. In this Corona time, something can be added to this list: home schooling her son Marlon (often combined with some bookkeeping or other stuff though, as you can see in the picture).

One of the jobs Olivia always enjoys doing, is the preparation of the interior of a cage for a new animal. According to Olivia “It is a nice job, as it involves a bit of knowing the species and the individual. It should generally be grateful, and you can see the animal makes good use of what you did.”

Here comes the rest of her interview:

What do you love about EV?

I love living surrounded by animals. I love being able to do a lot of different things, and yes, I also like to clean cages- maybe not every day, although this is often the case (with baby animals in care at home). The variation is one of the most beautiful things of living here, it basically never gets boring.

What would have happened if you would have left for Africa instead of South America 10 years ago?

Well, Africa would never have been a choice for me, but let’s say…. Australia, as that was in my head at the time. I might have ended up working with kangaroos or koalas. I always believe that, if you work intensively with a species, they all grow special. This is one of the reasons why I have a hard time answering the question; which animal do I like most?

What didn’t you expect before starting EV?

In many ways I think I did expect what we have done so far- sounds maybe weird, but well, I am a bit of a control freak.

What are you most proud of?

Of course, I am very proud of our achievements in how we have been able to rescue so many animals. But most proud I am of the support group that we have behind us and EV. This is something we achieved in these years that is really amazing. EV is not only us and the volunteers, but a huge network of ex-volunteers, friends, family, and many professionals from different countries.

What is your favorite job/activity?

A difficult one, as there are many. One of the things I always enjoy doing is the interior of a cage, preparing it for a specific animal, like the sleeping box, branches and some enrichment. It is a nice job, as it involves a bit of knowing the species, the individual, observing it and you can see how grateful it is, as you can see the animal makes good use of what you did.

Would you like to have a month where you would just do the work volunteers do?

Yes. I had to think a bit, as maybe a month would be long, but if I add up what I do over the year, I think I easily come to way more than a month in doing the same work as volunteers. But I never do it everyday for a month, it is always in between, and that can be very hectic. So yes I would want to do it for a month, and then really only as a volunteer- but is that really possible still?

What is the most difficult thing about living here?

That everything gets fungus or cockroaches get to it! But maybe on a personal level, it gets lonely sometimes. The loneliness is sometimes hard, missing people that really know me and being able to meet them and talk about something not animal/work related. Don’t get me wrong, I do love to talk about animals, but I need a change every now and then.

If you could go back in time, would EV look very different?

Not much, but there is sometimes stuff that, retrospectively, we could have done differently like building the volunteer house a bit higher, so we don’t risk the river flooding it.

What will EV look like in 10 years?

Probably a bit bigger, and hopefully with a lot more surrounding land that we are protecting.

What would you do with 5000 soles (not to be spent EV related)?

When we can leave all together, use it for a holiday with the family.

What do you like to do on the weekend?

Sleep, read, watch a movie, make some pizza or bread (or something different).

Which memory at EV makes you laugh/happy?

There are many small moments, often to do with animals we raised and released and seeing them back after some time doing well. One animal that comes to my mind is Tupak, the white throated toucan we raised and released. We thought he went missing, most likely killed, but then he showed up after several weeks, and he did not even want me to come close…. Animals often surprise you, which is a good thing. More than once I have thought that an animal might not have made it….and then I was luckily proven wrong.

What animal is Douwe most like?

Not easy, after some thinking, I think a beaver is the one. Always building something.

What is the most recent thing you have learned?

That agoutis are very determined animals.

How did Corona influence this place in your eyes?

In general- so far not so much, as work just goes on as usual, as we are fairly isolated. However, it influences the group of volunteers a lot, as it is not changing, nobody leaving, no new ones coming. It has become a very tight group and it is beautiful to see how they deal with being so isolated, as contact with the outside world (family and friends) had to be restricted to a minimum.

Interviews

Meet the Corona crew ! Episode 1 : Douwe

Meet the Corona crew !
Episode 1 : Douwe

We find ourselves in a unique situation at EV with a very stable crew: the whole team has been here for at least 3 months now! We would like to introduce you to this ‘Corona Crew’, next up: Douwe!

Douwe came to the Peruvian jungle 10 years ago to start Esperanza Verde together with Olivia. Today he still is a proud director of EV and is involved in every project. What is he most proud of? “The animals we have been able to return to the wild.”


Douwe is a real handyman and, at least it looks like this for the volunteers, is able to fix everything. However, on the question ‘What is the most recent thing you have learned?’, Douwe answered: “Doing an interview is not as easy as it sounds.” Still, Douwe managed to answer all his questions :

What do you love about EV?

That it is in the middle of the jungle, with a lot of animals.

What would have happened if you would have left for Africa instead of South America 10 years ago?

I would not have left for Africa, as I was already there.

What didn’t you expect before starting EV?

I hoped it would be like it is now.

What are you most proud of?

The animals that we have been able to return to the wild.

What is your favorite job/activity?

Handling the animals, but of course only when there is sufficient cause for it.

Would you like to have a month where you would just do the work volunteers do?

No, been there, done that.

What is the most difficult thing about living here?

People, in my opinion, communication is so much more difficult than with animals.

If you could go back in time, would EV look very different?

No, but if I could go back and would have had 1 million dollars it might look different. I think I would have chosen a different spot, more suitable for state of the art construction and infrastructure.

What will EV look like in 10 years?

More or less the same, but probably a bit bigger.

What would you do with 5000 soles (not to be spent EV related)?

Buy some nice tools (no this is not EV related!).

What do you like to do on the weekend?

Relax, be more in the forest.

Which memory at EV makes you laugh/happy?

Mica (adult female capuchin monkey), finding Marlons water paint colors at the construction site while I was babysitting him. Colors everywhere….

What animal is Olivia most like?

A bee, always `buzzing` around everywhere

What is the most recent thing you have learned?

Doing an interview is not as easy as it sounds. But I continuously learn things….

How did Corona influence this place in your eyes?

The Management changed a lot. Daily life generally stays the same. The organizing of food and material- the administration got a lot more complicated.

News

Challenges

One of the biggest challenges for a wildlife conservation project like Esperanza Verde definetely is the arrival of a large groups of animal. Every single animal requires and definitely deserves our full attention, providing this for over twenty animals at the same time might feel overwhelming at first. Luckily, we always have a very dedicated team of volunteers, who, together with the management team and the local workers, make the seemingly impossible happen.
This spring the ministry donated not only birds and monkeys of different species, but also reptiles like caimans, snakes and tortoises. On top of that we received a tamandua, an agouti, a paka and a porcupine. As soon as word arrives in Esperanza Verde about an animal delivery of that size, preparations are made: cages geared up, fruit and vegetables cut, everyone keeps busy. On arrival each individual gets an initial health check, some of them lucky enough to be released right after their quarantine period. Others spend some more time under our care, to later join the outside group of our resident animals. The juvenile animals among them need a bigger share of attention. In this case it was the baby tamandua Kassai. For the moment it is the regular supply with milk, that keeps everyone awake. Soon it will be a growing hunger for termites and ants that will require the whole teams effort.

Construction

Progress update on the New Quarantine Facility

Over the last few months our new Quarantine Facility has really started to take shape. This project was only possible thanks to a generous donation from Jaap van de Graaf, a Dutch foundation. 

At 60m2 the new quarantine building is a major undertaking. Building anything in a remote region of the Amazon jungle comes with is challenges and such a big construction has really put our team to the test. However this month the walls have been gaining height as row upon row of new bricks have been laid. The drainage system is complete and we can see the end in sight.

When animals first arrive at our rescue centre they must spend at least four weeks in quarantine separated from the other animals. This both protects our resident animals from any disease the new animals might be carrying, but also gives us the opportunity to observe the new animals and assess their health and treatment requirements. Once this quarantine facility is completed we will have a much-needed new facility to house these animals and carry out this vital work

Animals

Completion of Lush Funded Enclosures

The completion of the Elmo enclosure in February marked the completion of the final enclosure funded by the Lush Charitable Giving Program. The Lush Program provides funding to small, grassroots organisations that, like us, are working tirelessly to protect animals and their environment.

The Elmo enclosure is the biggest of the projects sponsored by Lush and has taken nearly 12 months to construct. We are constantly receiving new animals confiscated from the illegal wildlife trade and so it is vital that we build new enclosures on a regular basis. 

The completion of Elmo enclosure could not of come soon enough, as within days the Peruvian government confiscated nearly nine hundred parakeets, macaws and other parrots. These birds were malnourished and dehydrated and were quickly bought to Esperanza Verde. The Elmo enclosure, like our other enclosures, give these animals time to rehabilitate and hopefully once they are fit and healthy a chance to be released back into the wild.

Animals

Support from Wild Futures

Wild Futures is a primate welfare and conservation charity based in the UK. As well as running a sanctuary in Cornwall for primates rescued from the pet trade, they also provide support to many organisations that are protecting primates worldwide. We are thrilled to announce that this year Esperanza Verde was granted funding as part of Wild Futures overseas support program.

This grant will allow the team in Peru to build another much needed rehabilitation enclosure. These enclosures are a vital part of our work and provide a safe environment for rescued animals to transition back in to the wild. Like these monkeys pictured, the majority of animals at Esperanza Verde are rescued from the illegal wildlife trade and, after a period of rehabilitation, they are given a second chance at freedom. Thanks to the support of Wild Futures, the team in Peru will be able to begin construction of this much needed enclosure soon. Further updates soon.

Animals

Mica became a mum !

Mica, a female capuchin, was taken from the wild as a very small baby. She was confiscated from the wildlife trade and hand raised by our team, before being released back into the wild. She was the very first monkey we rescued and spotting her with a baby justifies all our hard work!